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Lieberman vs. Foote: a comparison

The following are brief excerpts from both Foote's and Lieberman's books. I simply started at the beginning of Lieberman's book and looked for where it started looking like Foote's book. I noticed Foote cross referenced chapter 3, so I checked out the first page of that chapter as well. As far as I can tell, Lieberman's entire book came from Foote's. These excerpts are not exceptions, but excellent examples of Lieberman's continuous plagiarism throughout the book.

A Side-By-Side Comparison of Foote's The Business Side of Creativity and
Lieberman's Creative Warriors Walk Alone
FooteLieberman
Chapter 1: Why the Opportunity Has Never Been BetterOpportunity Has Never Been Brighter: (page 1)
For many of us, starting our own business has always been a dream. Although entrepreneurial trends wax and wane, there has never been a better time to be one's own boss than now. Because small businesses are generally perceived as having a better record of productivity and innovation than larger companies, governments continue to develop entrepreneurial incentives. These initiatives, united with recent sociological trends emphasizing individual freedom and values, have created the healthiest climate for the entrepreneur in the last one hundred years.

Is all this just temporary? Surely it is to some extent, for economic trends will always be cyclical. Nonetheless, there is also considerable evidence of deep, structural change. In many areas of business, particularly creative services, the trend of “smaller is better” will continue, even strengthen. This is why it is a great time to have a freelance business.
Starting one's own business has always been pinnacle in fully achieving every aspect of the American dream. We live in a society founded upon individual rights and economies. In addition, self-employment represents capitalism in its purest form, and being the boss is ingrained in the very concept of the American character. Since our population, unlike most other nations, is a heterogeneous one, our culture fosters a spirit of self-reliance, of adventure, and a willingness to try new things. Because this is both our heritage and something of a national religion, the economic oligarchy valued elsewhere stands as one of the principals of our national consciousness. Indeed, so ingrained in our culture is the value of the individual entrepreneur that when economic forces threaten his or her prosperity, Congress always intercedes. Since small businesses have a better record of productivity and innovation than larger companies, the federal government has developed a number of entrepreneurial incentives. These initiatives, united with recent sociological trends emphasizing individual values, have created the healthiest climate for the entrepreneur in the last one hundred years.
Skills for a Postindustrial EconomySkills For a New Economy (page 2)
Economies worldwide are undergoing a transition from an industrial base to one based on services and information. It's a changeover as potentially sweeping as the industrial revolution or the mechanization of agriculture. In this new society, communication skills are increasingly important and the number of jobs available for creatively skilled individuals will continue to increase. More important, however, is where much of that increase will take place.

In the past, because most markets were relatively stable, manufacturing industries relied largely upon vertical integration for the control necessary for profit-making efficiency. Now, the value added to a product increasingly comes from marketing, sales, and distribution, not manufacturing. In this time of market volatility brought about by the speed of information transmittal and the globalization of markets, economic efficiency often comes from reliance upon a flexible network of suppliers. By instituting such a network, companies can move more quickly, concentrating on what they can do best and leaving the rest to outside specialists like you.
The American economy is undergoing a transition, as potentially sweeping as the industrial revolution or the mechanization of agriculture, from an industrial base to one based on services and information. In this new society, communications skills are increasingly important and the number of jobs available for creatively skilled individuals will continue to increase. More important, however, is where much of that increase will take place. In the past, because most markets were relatively stable, manufacturing industries relied largely upon vertical integration for the control necessary for profit-making efficiency. Now, the value added to a product increasingly comes from marketing, sales, and distribution, not manufacturing. In the time of market volatility brought about by the speed of information transmittal and the globalization of markets, economic efficiency often comes from reliance upon a flexible network of suppliers. By instituting such a network, companies can move more quickly, concentrating on what they can do best and leaving the rest to outside specialists—like you.
The changes brought on by information technology are also having a profound effect on service businesses, such as marketing communications. Organizations of today and tomorrow are electronic workplaces in which traditional references of time, space, and gography are blurred. It is possible (albeit not always practical) to have writers in New York working with designers in Los Angeles, production people in Chicago working on projects for clients in London, or an interactive firm in Sydney handling the Web design and hosting for a client in Auckland.

Technology makes it possible for creative individuals to work easily outside the traditional work environment. Word-processed copy can be transmitted between continents in minutes. Digital design allows everything from concepts ot proofs to finished art to be creatied and modified anyplace. Graphics can be transmitted and rendered in realistic color anywhere a desktop printer is available. Fax machines and overnight delivery services remove all limitations on where illustration is created. A client looking at a Web site makeover on his or her office computer doesn't care where the creator is located. Moreover, even with the tremendous advances in the last decade or so, communication technologies are still in their nascent stages. (A caution is in order, too. See “Can you do it anywhere?” in Chapter 3.)
The changes brought by information technology are also having a profound effect in service businesses, such as marketing communications. The shop of tomorrow will surely be an electronic workplace in which traditional references of time, space and geography are blurred. It will be possible (although not always practical) to have writers in New York working with art directors in Los Angeles and production people in Chicago – on projects for a client in London. Indeed, this is already happening. Technology makes it possible for creative individuals to work easily outside the traditional environment. Word-processed copy can be transmitted between continents in minutes. Electronic design allows everything from concepts to finished art to be created and modem-ed anywhere. Text and graphics can be output anywhere. Fax machines, overnight delivery services, and the Internet remove all limitations on where illustration is done. Moreover, these enabling technologies are still in their nascent stages.
Marketing communication, as we know it, went through two major phases in the last half-century. The first phase was largely concerned with analysis: what should be communicated using what techniques. The second phase was largely concerned with creativity: how to attract attention and ensure memorability. Now we are well into the third phase: how to do things more productively. In an era of high and escalating communication costs, productivity plays an increasingly large role in determining communications efficiency.

As a freelancer you will be in an excellent position to take advantage of this trend; you will be in the right place at the right time in history. Alike other a la carte business suppliers, a freelance can bring to the communications efforts of an organization excellent work without the inflexibility and expense of a large staff and overhead.

In other words, a freelance supplier offers an organization the opportunity to reduce communications expenses without reducing communications quality.
Marketing communications, as we know it, has gone through two major phases in this century. The first phase was largely concerned with analysis: what should be communicated and what techniques to use. The second phase was largely concerned with creativity: how to attract attention and ensure remembrance. Now, we are well into the third phase: how to do things more productively. In an era of high and escalating communications costs, productivity plays an increasingly large role in determining communications efficiency. As a warrior, you will be in an excellent position to take advantage of the trend. A warrior can bring, to the communications efforts of a company, excellent work without the inflexibility and expense of a large staff and overhead. In other words, a warrior supplier offers an organization the opportunity to reduce communications expenses without reducing communications quality.
The Ripple Effect of Corporate ChangeThe Current Effect of Corporate Evolution (page 3)
Your success as a freelance will also be directly related to the revolutionary changes in corporate structure that have taken place. That's not because you will necessarily be working directly for corporations, but because of the positive impact corporate changes have on the market and pay for freelance services.

Agencies, small companies without staff, public service organizations, and institutions have always generated a certain amount of freelance work. Many individuals have made a very respectable living from these sources in the past. Nonetheless, most freelances recognize that the larger and more sophisticated an organization is, the bigger the job, paycheck, and satisfaction that usually result.

Unfortunately, it has also been largely true that the larger the organization, the more likely it was that substantially all its creative needs would be handled internally, or provided by a large creative organization, such as an advertising agency or design firm. Because of their training, most managers felt most comfortable dealing with people who had line responsibilities within their company, or within a similar hierarchical organization. They did not feel comfortable working with outside, entrepreneurial suppliers.
Your success as a warrior directly relates to the revolutionary and recent changes in corporate structure. This success is not correlated with working directly for corporations but, more so, with the positive affect that corporate changes will have on the market and pay for warrior services. Agencies, small companies without staff, public service organizations, and institutions generate warrior work, and many individuals have made a very respectable living from these sources in the past. Nonetheless, most warriors recognize that work with larger, sophisticated organizations results ina big jobs, large paychecks, and greater satisfaction. Unfortunately, larger organizations usually house all of its creative organization, such as an advertising agency or design firm. Because of their training, most managers felt most comfortable dealing with people who had line responsibility within their company or with a similar hierarchical organization, not with outside, entrepreneurial suppliers.
Chapter 3: Planning Your FuturePlan Your Goals (page 20)
Okay. You've seen the opportunities. You've carefully weighed the risks. And you've decided that freelancing is for you. Now it's time to actually start planning your break from the organizational world, to begin laying the groundwork that will ensure your successful feature as an independent creative.

It's tough knowing where to start, what to do. As soon as you begin making serious plans, the reality of the change you'll be making hits you—hard. Chances are that the very process will start you second-guessing your decision, which, in turn, makes planning even harder. The result is to discourage you from planning—to encourage you either to charge ahead on impulse, or to chicken out. But you know that both are copouts. You've got too much riding on this decision to start playing Russian roulette with your career.

As uncreative and discouraging as you may personally find planning to be, it is essential if you want to ensure your success. The more you can do to take the variability out of what will always be, at best, a very unpredictable business, the more stability your freelancing will have. And the more you can accomplish now, the more financial security you will end up with, too.

The purpose of this chapter is to help you overcome the planning hurdle, to help you structure a stable and financially secure business. It identifies those things you'll need to know and do before you actually hang out your shingle.
Okay. You have seen the opportunities and carefully weighed the risks. If freelancing is still for you, start planning your break from the organizational world and begin laying the groundwork that will assure your successful future as a warrior. As soon as you begin making serious plans, the reality of this drastic change will hit you hard. The very process will start you second-guessing your decision, which, in turn, makes planning even more difficult. The result discourages you from planning and encourages you either to charge ahead on impulse or to chicken out. However, you know that both are cop-outs. You have too much riding on this decision to start playing Russian roulette with your career. As uncreative and discouraging as you may personally find planning to be, it is essential to success. The less variability existing in a very unpredictable business results in a more stable freelancing career. In addition, the more accomplished now, then the better financial security will be later.

This chapter will help you over come the planning hurdle and structure a stable and financially secure business by defining what you will need to know and do before you actually hang out your shingle.



Original post about Lieberman's art theft and plagiarism here.
Tags: lieberman, plagiarism
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